Wednesday, December 24, 2008

2 Types of Cartoonists - Origin of styles




There are 2 basic types of cartoonists, each exemplified by the illustrations above.
The one on the left is by T.S. Sullivant, the one on the right by Milt Gross.


Almost every cartoonist since the early days has a style based on a variation of one of these, or some combination of the 2.

CARICATURE or CONSERVATIVE CARTOONS
T.S. Sullivant represents the kind of cartooning that is based on interpreting real life. His style is caricature. He keenly observes what things really look like and then changes their proportions to create a funny version of life. His animals have anatomy. His scenes follow the rules of perspective.
This I would call the conservative cartoon approach, because he is not creating anything from scratch and has strict rules and disciplines based on actual observations in nature that he adheres to.
I love and envy highly skilled conservative art.
http://duck-walk.blogspot.com/2006/04/ts-sullivant.html
http://images.google.com/images?q=t.s.%20sullivant&hl=en&hs=9fW&lr=&client=opera&rls=en&sa=N&tab=wi

Animation cartoonists that lean towards the conservative representational style are Chuck Jones, Milt Kahl and Ken Anderson.


CARTOONY or RADICAL CARTOONS
Milt Gross is the opposite of conservative. He is radically creative. His drawings are made by design and invention and don't represent what things actually look like. He defies anatomy and perspective and just arranges all his elements purely upon what is pleasing to the eye. He is a master creator and designer.
http://www.bugpowder.com/andy/e.gross.html
http://inspiration-grab-bag.blogspot.com/2006/02/milt-gross-newspaper-comics-1928-32.html
Bob Clampett, Tex Avery, Jim Tyre and the Fleischers are animators that lean towards the more cartoony and wacky style.


EARLY COMIC STRIPS
Most early cartoon art followed the conservative approach, but somewhere near the end of the 19th century pure cartoons were invented, or maybe they evolved from caricature. I need a comic strip historian to help me here.

Some early comic strips, like the Katzenjammer Kids and Mutt and Jeff are pure cartoons, in that the characters are made of balls and tubes and simple, non-anatomical shapes.
http://www.bugpowder.com/andy/e.sterrett-all.html

Here's a nice page from Cliff Sterret who falls mostly in the cartoony/designy school of cartoonists.

Look how cool the cat is!

Note how it looks nothing like an actual cat. This is an important point!

I'll talk a lot about that in more articles.
http://www.coconino-world.com/modules/sterret/polly_tm/cvpolly.htm









Other comic strips like The Yellow Kid or Little Nemo are more representational like Sullivant's work.


Some strips, like The Kin-Der-Kids by Lionel Feininger are a combination of the two, in his case leaning towards the representational style, but with elements of cartoon-abstract design.To see more classic comic stips go to Andy's Early Comics Page:
http://www.bugpowder.com/andy/earlycomics.html


This post is the first in a continuing series about the history, forms and traditions of cartoon styles.

Animated cartoons grew directly out of the rules and styles of comic strips and then developed some new ideas of their own and became what I think of as the most creative art form in history.

Keep abreast of these articles if you want to be able to better grasp why you draw like you do.

Links:
Shane Glines at Cartoon Retro has the most amazing collection of Milt Gross' comic books.

http://www.cartoonretro.com/

Milt Gross' style really evolved over the years.
He's mostly known as a comic strip artist, but in my opinion his best work is in comic books which he did in his later years.

It's really rare for an artist to get better as he ages, but Milt kept improving right up to the end of his life.

Go sign up at Cartoon Retro now to see some of the greatest cartoon art ever!






Here's some interesting Milt Gross, stuff that's earlier and not as designy or wacky as the comic books but still pretty fun.
http://www.animationarchive.org/2006/04/media-milt-gross-cartoon-tour-of-new.html

Thanks to Clarke Snyde for some great links!
Especially this one:
http://inspiration-grab-bag.blogspot.com/

87 comments:

Joel Bryan said...

Woah! That's even better than I anticipated. Some of these cats are totally new to me and I thought I was a person who knew stuff about things... and vice versa!

I can't wait to look at these pics more in-depth and read more of these posts!

Evan said...

Interesting.

I think I understand what you mean, is it kinda like there's caricature/realism-type cartoons on one hand and then kinda wacky/abstract on the other end of that spectrum, and depending on the artist they lean more to one side or the other?

Marc Deckter said...

T.S. Sullivant:
http://www.coconino-world.com/sites_auteurs/sullivant/index.html

Thanks for this informative post, John! I look forward to reading and learning more.

JohnK said...

Hi Marc

I found that site, but it doesn't have his best stuff on it.

I want all his animal stuff. Know any other sites?

Marc Deckter said...

I want all his animal stuff. Know any other sites?

No, I don't know of any other sites. But I went ahead and uploaded all the Sullivant animal drawings I have on my hard drive - I posted them on my blog - here's the permanent link:

http://duck-walk.blogspot.com/2006/04/ts-sullivant.html

Hopefully some of these images are the ones you were looking for!

Morly said...

Hey John,

Brilliantly informative as always, thanks. Your Lionel Feininger comment about combining the two styles put me in mind of Tony Millionaire who draws the brilliant comic, Maakies. Guy can draw ridiculously well, but his main characters are completely goofy and grotesque. Pretty great stuff if you've not seen it (www.maakies.com).

Keep up the good work!

r said...

Now this is a neat post.

Who would you pinpoint as the first to draw characters with that oh-so-popular eye? You know, the typical "O" with the dot at the bottom for the iris, Woody Woodpecker style or Mickey circa the Fantasia movie.

Peggy said...

Ah, that's what you mean when you say Disney cartoons are in the same path as Sullivant. I got stuck on the very different shapes and never saw that you meant 'working from the real world' versus 'working from your head'. I'm looking forwards to hearing who you think was in neither of these two camps. *grin*

That page of Fenninger makes me realize how much of an influence having The Smithsonian Book of Comic-Strip Comics was on my art. I always wanted to see more, much more, of The Kin-Der-Kids than the two pages in that book; something about those images still haunts me. In a good way.

Evan said...

As much as I love wacky styles, I'm finding myself really enjoying Sullivant. Thanks for show us this John, and thanks for posting more pictures Marc. Great stuff.

Brett W. Thompson said...

Great post!! So informative, and I can't wait for more.

You're an excellent writer, John; I love your blog :)

Celedux said...

Definitely enjoyed this post today, and I've got a question as to what your thoughts are on a particular cartoonist.

David Low, a relatively well-known journalist from early in the 20th century, has drawn what are in my opinion some of the most thought-provoking cartoons I've ever seen. Here's a link to one of my favorites of his:

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/2WWpotsdam.JPG

Just curious as to your thoughts on his work John.

More info on David Low: http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/Jlow.htm

Gabriel said...

Of those folks here I liked Cliff Sterret the most. I had never heard of him, he's amazing! He's really cartoony yet it's possible to see some conservative stuff (he mixes cartoony people with real people!).
You mentioned Mutt and Jeff but didn't post any pics, it's a pity, I suppose people here would like them. I sure do. Hey John, what do you think of Krazy Kat?
Please do this kind of posts more often, they rule.

Gabriel said...

Oh, and what about people like Arthur Rackham? Do you think we could call him a conservative cartoonist? Was he a cartoonist at all?

C. A. M. Thompson said...

That Milt Gross stuff is wonderfully crazy.

Daniel R. said...

Hello John:

I found this blog's entry very interesting, and useful to put in accurate terms why I like it so much that joke in Ren & Stimpy's "Man Best Friend", when both characters change from cartoony to conservative appearance, at the pet shop: that was hilarious for the mix of drawing styles.

Everytime I see your blog learn new stuff.

Thanks, John!
Salutes from Mexico.

JohnK said...

>>Oh, and what about people like Arthur Rackham? Do you think we could call him a conservative cartoonist? Was he a cartoonist at all?<<

I think he was a gifted illustrator that had an exaggerated style-very similar to Sullivant, and I'm sure he influenced lots of cartoonists.

I think what makes someone a cartoonist is that the drawings are funny or light hearted at least.

JohnK said...

>>Ah, that's what you mean when you say Disney cartoons are in the same path as Sullivant. I got stuck on the very different shapes and never saw that you meant 'working from the real world' versus 'working from your head'.

No, that's not what I mean.

I'll explain soon.

Disney actually aped Sullivant's style in the late 40s.

Lambert the Sheepish Lion is a good example.Same exact shapes as Sullivant's lions.

David DeGrand said...

This was a very informative post, I always love your thoughts on cartoonists and comics, being a huge fan of yours. I can see the Milt Gross influence in your stuff, but I love how you took what you liked about it and made it unique. That's the one thing that I like most about your work, you can tell that you are in love with the cartoon medium and have the amazing talent to create something completely new by using your influences as a place to start, and then just running wild with them. Also can't wait for more George Liquor stories!

Danne8a said...

I love Milt Gross!
Thanks for the postings!

Marc Deckter said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
C. A. M. Thompson said...

There's some Sullivant stuff on this page.

Katie said...

I've really been looking forward to reading theories like this! Thanks for writing it out so well and making it easy to absorb. I can't wait for the next theory post.

Chet said...

i guess im more of a what you would call ''charicature artist''

Ill take it!

Danne8a said...

Hey John, just out of curiosity, what are your thoughts on Winsor Mccay's old comic strips?

Marc Deckter said...

Sorry to keep re-posting!

I just wanted to follow Kappappa's example and make links that are easier to follow:

T.S. SULLIVANT ANIMALS

BARNACLE PRESS

Ok, no more posts for me!

David said...

Hey man, the first one looks like Jasper! Is that a tribute?

Chloe Cumming said...

This is really great stuff. Your bloggy teaching methods are providing a great service to humanity. I have nervous excitement in my tummy.

This topic is spookily but usefully synchronising with the tensions I’ve been having with my own drawing just lately. I’ve been radically revising all my habits and assumptions about the way I draw since my cartoon-love has been reinvigorated by this blog and Katie’s and this little community of supporters, and the immediacy of cartoons combined with the immediacy of reading about them in blog form… it’s a definitely an addictive formula.

Most of the drawing that I do for fun or in preparation for painting is more or less in the ‘conservative’ camp, I suppose. Lately I’ve been experimenting with injecting more looseness and elasticity into them, because I admire and envy those qualities in your drawings and the ‘radical’ artists who influence you. Also I can see how wholesome it would be if I could ‘learn’ a face and hold it in my brain in three dimensions, I can see how liberating it would be to have the facility to draw and invent poses and scenes in that radically creative way, without reference.

I really really want to break away from being a slave to brittle one-eyed photographic reality.

And I’ve always been attracted to the idiosyncrasies that appear in the process of drawing and committed observation that could potentially be worked into something really funny. I’ll have to see if I can reach some kind of satisfactory compromise on your radical-conservative continuum.

Getting as far as reducing a likeness or a figure into traditional sphere-pear-tube construction (or something like it) is something that is still pretty challenging to me, I don’t know if I’ll want or need to take it that far as a matter of course, but I have a new appreciation for the people who can do that with ease.

I like the simplicity of the definition of a cartoonist as someone who does drawings that are funny. Humour can be a subjective and personal thing but if you can find a way to translate your own subtle observations of the little absurdities of things visually, that’s a tremendous gift. I mean it’s a rare talent, but it’s also literally like a gift, for everybody to enjoy. Enjoyment and joy seem to be too far down the list of priorities for most contemporary cartoons… and art… and music…

It’s that thing of visual humour being so much richer in a profound way but harder to copy, harder to reduce, which is part of the reason why most of the humour in modern cartoons is not visual, and why visual humour is so much more rewarding.

There’s so much about purely pictorial creation/entertainment that seems to defy mundane description, but this blog definitely has the potential to steer people into that kind of rarefied creative frenzy where you can make those wordless discoveries.

(Is it narcissistic to talk about your own drawings when replying to blog posts? What’s the etiquette? It’s the best way I have to relate to this stuff but it still feels weird. And sorry to post such a long comment.)

R2K said...

I love those old strips.

R2K

Robert Hume said...

Wow this really is an amazing blog. I've always read articles and heard you in interviews talking about alot of these theories and origins of styles and designs but I never fully understood what you were talking about. It's very cool that your takeing the time to write all this out for us to understand. It's really informative. I can't wait to see the next post on design theory and styles.

BTW I was looking at your sketches, and I was woundering... Do you use a Sentic to sketch all of these out. Or in other words, a touch sensitive monitor(everyone seems to be using them these days, is why I ask)?

Jitterbug said...

"Most early cartoon art followed the conservative approach, but somewhere near the end of the 19th century pure cartoons were invented, or maybe they evolved from caricature. I need a comic strip historian to help me here."

James Swinnerton was one of the 1st funny talking animal artists.

Joel Bryan said...

Yeah, I want to know how Winsor McCay fits in more... since he bridged comic strips to animated cartoons. And George Herriman, since "Krazy Kat" was so popular and he was so influential- for example, early E.C. Segar right up until he created Popeye borrowed a lot of style from him.

I tend to think while the cat vs. mouse dynamic was apparent long before "Krazy Kat," a lot of early cartoons must've borrowed or been nudged into those directions by his work. I mean, the simple antagonist/protagonist fight structure of so many cartoons seems to relate back to Herriman's sophisticatedly simple stories.

Milt Gross' early style seems similar to both Herriman's and Segar's but his later stuff is something else entirely!

Anonymous said...

Is it me, or do "Pete the Pooch" and Jasper from "Big House Blues" look similar? :)

Clarke (Csnyde) said...

Thanks for yet another in a great run of informative and extremely insightful posts John.

While I love seeing your artwork and reading your hilarious concepts, it is these types of posts that I think I truly look forward to more than anything. I can't wait to read the next installment already, so don't make us wait too long.

And a big thanks for plugging my blog.

I'd love to hear your thoughts on any of the stuff I have posted there if you have the time.

nate said...

Great post, John.

I've asked you this before, but I'm gonna ask again. What's your take on Saul Steinberg? Is his style too flat for your tastes?

nate said...

I don't know why my previous entry posted 7 times.

Sorry everyone.

JohnK said...

>>
I've asked you this before, but I'm gonna ask again. What's your take on Saul Steinberg? Is his style too flat for your tastes?<<

Not too flat. I have nothing against flat if it's visually appealling or funny.

Steinberg is ugly, primitive and depressing to me.

It couldn't be called cartooning in my world.

Virgil Partch, on the other hand, who was probably influenced by Steinberg, is a great and funny cartoonist.

Josh "Just What the Doctor Ordered" Heisie said...

Thanks for the informative stuff!

Was Pete the Pooch the inspiration for Jasper from Big House Blues?

Anonymous said...

John,
Thank you for thie remarkable blog. I learn something new with each of your posts. I'm a fan of historic comics, including Little Nemo and Kazenjammer Kids. I have the Smithsonian's big book of newspaper cartoons and enjoy seeing the evolution of comics. Some of the old editorial cartoons by Thomas Nast are also very good compared to today's editorial cartoons. Thanks again for your insight!

- Eric A.

JohnK said...

>>Was Pete the Pooch the inspiration for Jasper from Big House Blues?

I ripped him off. I was dying to see him animated.

I'm guilty, but at least I admit it!

I can't tell you how many times I've seen my characters appear in other cartoons-how about the Ripping Friends?

Or Sody Pop?

Maybe I should post about it and everyone can find all the Spumco rip offs and link to them.

nate said...

Steinberg is ugly, primitive and depressing to me.

It couldn't be called cartooning in my world.

Virgil Partch, on the other hand, who was probably influenced by Steinberg, is a great and funny cartoonist.


That makes sense. I really appreciate Steinberg for his visual cleverness. I would call him a cartoonist, but I see where your coming from.

I like Virgil Partch too. I never noticed the possible Steinberg influence, but I definitely see it now.

JohnK said...

>>That makes sense. I really appreciate Steinberg for his visual cleverness. I would call him a cartoonist, but I see where your coming from.

What's clever about it? Looks like scribbling to me.

That's the kind of stuff that led to the downfall of cartoons.

I don't understand the concept of men drawing like retarded 3 year olds.

Anonymous said...

Hmmm...well, Sullivant didn't completely invent the iconic cartoon lion-head shape that you reference for Lambert, either; you could argue that Tenniel did it also, earlier--and as you know there are dozens of other early cartoonists(from the 19th as well as early 20th)who likely did. If you're going to caricature a lion, its not a leap to exaggerate the head--and then the features on the head, etc...W.W. Denslow did it also with the cowardly lion in his original "Oz" illos. Obviously Sullivant was one of the greatest animal cartoonist geniuses ever, and he sure did have a huge influence on Disney. Ditto Heinrich Kley. But a lot of the 40s-50 animation artists at Dsneys also had their own styles and had had a much superior art education than most animators today can dream of, at Chouinards and the Art Student's League, etc.

I think a lot of artists absorb everything good, and what they use is where it becomes individualistic, no?

Anonymous said...

Saul Steinberg is an illustrator not a cartoonist. He is the guy that many fine artists go ape-shh for.

Jitterbug said...

What do you think of James Swinnerton?

http://www.coconino-world.com/sites_auteurs/swinnerton/bio/kid02_01.jpg

he was one of the very 1st cartoony cartoonist. I believe he also did the 1st ever American Comic strip

Anonymous said...

It's spelled Tyer, not Tyre. You know that, John! It was either a typo, or you got Mike Kazaleh to type it for you.

Anonymous said...

There was also a French artist named Grandville whose work influenced Disney, particularly in late 30's character design.

Robert Hume said...

lol I'm sorry...I believe that's Cintiq!! I'm a Horrible speller

nate said...

What's clever about it? Looks like scribbling to me.

That's the kind of stuff that led to the downfall of cartoons.

I don't understand the concept of men drawing like retarded 3 year olds.


Are we gonna get into another form vs. content discussion? I think the genius of Steinberg is that he can take a complicated observation and communicate it in an incredibly simple way. That's where his talent lies, and the way in which he does this is how he is clever. His work is purposefully iconic because he's more about the idea, and that iconic style communicates those ideas in the way he wants them to be communicated. You're telling me that you think there's absolutely nothing positive about Steinberg's work?

I really don't understand why cartoonists and artists need to be so black and white. Why does everyone need to fit into a set of rules of what you think cartoons should be like? I love your work and I love Steinberg's work. There's room for both and both are valid.

I can understand feeling resentment towards that primitive/flat style because it's dominating TV animation right now, but that's no reason to disregard it.

nate said...

Saul Steinberg is an illustrator not a cartoonist. He is the guy that many fine artists go ape-shh for.

I think he's a cartoonist that art critics elevated to a fine artist. Aren't all cartoonists also illustrators?

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JohnK said...

>>You're telling me that you think there's absolutely nothing positive about Steinberg's work?

You shouldn't have to hunt for something positive.

The stuff I put up here is pretty obviously fun and imaginative and cartoony.

I like cartoons that are fun.

That's what my blog is about.

Scribbles are for somebody else, not cartoon fans.

Surely there's a blog for scribbly art where people can go love the crap out of it.

glamaFez said...

What type of cartoonist is William Steig, based on all the above?

Evan said...

Oh man Josh, good eye. Catching that Pete the Pooch/Jasper reference. I wondered why he looked so familiar!

I just looked up Steinberg too, he is very uninspiring. However, I can't quit looking at Marc's page of Sullivant drawings...

Anonymous said...

Jim Woodring! Now THERE was a drummer.

Chico Maivia said...

Y'know what I miss? Tex Avery cartoons. I used to love those, and haven't seen 'em in a while. Great post as per usual, John!

nate said...

You shouldn't have to hunt for something positive.

The stuff I put up here is pretty obviously fun and imaginative and cartoony.

I like cartoons that are fun.

That's what my blog is about.

Scribbles are for somebody else, not cartoon fans.

Surely there's a blog for scribbly art where people can go love the crap out of it.


I just thought that this was the type of discussion that this site is for. Sure, I wasn't talking about a cartoony fun artist, but isn't it beneficial to talk about stuff you don't think works as well? I figured you wouldn't like Steinberg, just wanted to hear why.

Kevin said...

this has been the best, and most informative post yet. the links were especially entertaining.

its actually really cool that Pete the Pooch inspired Jasper. Its just like when a musician borrows a riff from another song.

xtracrsP said...
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xtracrsP said...
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Elliot said...

There's plenty of scribbly crap on my blog.

Jennifer said...

What an informative post. I'm not a cartoonist or animator, but it gives me a better understanding of the artwork.

Hopefully the book gets published - this would be a good textbook for college and art school classes. Pearson Publishing specializes in publishing textbooks for classes.

S.G.A said...

I like it all kinds of stuff , call it fine art call it cartoons call it illustration, its all for us , from us, and opinions are fun to have an express, lets face it opinions ARE like but holes ; we all have one , they all make alot of noise , and we all think everybody elses stinks...
Any body who posts here has a soft spot for cartoons, no matter what we call a cartoon, heck most of the landscape painting I see is just a caricature of nature in primary colors. I love writing about cartoons.

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junior said...

help, i'm drowning!
I'd rather read in detail about two or three guys than be suddenly given a list of three hundred names!
This is just a suggestion for more meaningful comments, not trying to be a prick here.

onemanpunkband said...

and again, an F -ing amazing post, so much information and feedback...

Anonymous said...

>>I don't understand the concept of men drawing like retarded 3 year olds.

Judging by Adult Party Cartoon, you understand it all too well.

jorge garrido said...

John, do you like Archie Comic's Samm Schwartz? I bet you do!

>>I can't tell you how many times I've seen my characters appear in other cartoons-how about the Ripping Friends?

Curly Fuzz Poodle looks like teh dog from Hare Ribbin' It's a tribute, isn't it?

I love this post. I prefer the wacky radical style, and I'm gonna have to look up Milt Gross and get some books about him. His drawings are full of life!

JohnK said...

>>John, do you like Archie Comic's Samm Schwartz? I bet you do!<<

I don't which artist that is. My favorite Archie artist was Harry Lucy-I'm not sure if I spelled that right.

He's the guy who drew the sexiest girl poses.

jorge garrido said...

I never heard of Harry Lucey so I googled him and found his work and I totally recognize his style! I like it!

Samm Schwartx always drew in straight lines, except early in his career. He drew Jughead in his classic style long after everyone else made him modern. He worked at Arhcie until he died in 1997 and he still drew in his calssic style. If you've ever seen one of his stories you'll recognize him instantly since he's the only one who drew like that.

This is his old fashioned style: http://lambiek.net/artists/s/schwartz_samm/schwartz_jughead.jpg
http://www.comicbookresources.com/columns/oddball/enlarge.cgi?date=2002-09-12

and when he got older he got more stylized with straight thin pen lines and tons of in jokes and gags in the background:

http://www.comicartfans.com/GalleryPiece.asp?Page=1&Order=Date&Piece=76780&GSub=14409&GCat=0&UCat=0

Here's some instantly recognizable non-archie Samm artwork:

http://www.misterkitty.org/extras/stupidcovers/stupidcomics12.html
Samm drew pics # 1,2,3 and 6. And who's that on pic # 5? :D

Jorge Garrido said...

Hey everyone, if you like these old comics, there's this awesome tribute to them in this comic magazine called Nick mag Presents Spongebob SqaurePants. On the cover is a pirate treasure chest with a really old looking comic book on it with Spongebob jumping out of a drum. The magazine showes "Spongebob" comics from the past, including Spongebob if he was drawn by Windsor McKay, George Herriman, Charles Schultz, Jim Davis, and all kinds of calssic comics!

Ryan C. said...

Mr. K.. you are just amazing. Truly, American animation would be lost without you. You are my favorite animator, and I hope I am as sucessful with movement as you are. Very fluid and natural.

Dave said...

So whens the 8 episodes of the 1988 new beany and cecil going to come out on dvd? from the one I just viewed on the net, overall,It was pretty good,very true to Clampetts stuff from 1962-63. Would like to see more done by you.

zoe said...

FYI -- Mark Kennedy posted this Ken Anderson sketchbook of African animals. It shows PERFECTLY how much they ripped off the Sullivant caricatures:

http://sevencamels.blogspot.com/2007/04/sketchbook-in-africa-by-ken-anderson.html

Lucas Nine said...

About Sullivant: I've heard the story that Sullivant's work was hidden by Disney because it was a basis for his own character design...

Bill said...

"I can't tell you how many times I've seen my characters appear in other cartoons-how about the Ripping Friends?

Maybe I should post about it and everyone can find all the Spumco rip offs and link to them."

Please do post about it, many cartoons these days rip-off and screw up your pacing and ideas in Ren and Stimpy. Cartoons like Mighty B (the main character looks like a copy of one of my own characters), Chowder, Grimm adventures of Billy and Mandy, Spongbob Squarepants (later episodes), youngsters that rip-off Spumcos "style", and whatever else there is.

Taco Wiz said...

Not to be impatient or rude, but...

HOW MUCH LONGER UNTIL THE NEW GEORGE LIQUOR EPISODES?!

At least give some storyboards or layouts or somethin'! C'MON!!!!

www.cartoonthrills.org

I've heard rumors about this being the place for the new cartoon. Is that true?

Caleb said...

Great stuff. I can't wait to read more about the early days.

Vincent Waller said...

Merry Christmas John. Thanks for another year full of insightful brain & eye Candy.

WIL BRANCA said...

">>I don't understand the concept of men drawing like retarded 3 year olds.

Judging by Adult Party Cartoon, you understand it all too well."

Sour grapes, anyone?

P.S. - Merry Christmas, John. Thanks for putting so much effort into the blog. Good luck in the new year.

Okum Arts said...

How did I miss this? Excellent analysis.

Dani Guty said...

As a cartoon lover i would say that i love the way you think, and i also think that the Artists you admire can influence on your work, for example when i was a little girl (now im 17) who was happily hopping all around, i liked realism better, so i tried to make something realist, well not really well done, and as the time went by, i watched more cartoons,specially disney ones (my style was defined when i was trying to do a fanart of Phineas and ferb, and then i drew an "a" that looked like an eye...so, kept practising and practising...until my style become mine) and my first ocs (at least on an art site im on) were more cartoony, im now more into caricature,tough, i love the toony look because is more expresive and funny, ......Excuse me for being confusing

PD: i think that the best way is going both ways... because it shows that you got talent on both sides! :D