Monday, December 03, 2007

Creativity Magazine



Here's an article about my association with Hoytyboy, and they included my ideas about Direct Sponsorship.
here's the rest....

13 comments:

MikeSnj said...

Cool. Hopefully this will lead to new cartoons.

Mr. Trombley said...

Are there segregated commercial laws that limit the practicality of direct sponsorship in today's market, or do they only regulate advertising products directly related to the series.
If I recall correctly the Dumont Network (of Honeymooners fame) was the first to use multiple advertisers, to compensate for a lack of popularity. Multi-sponsor advertising (called magazine style) was was also used to avoid censorship by the advertisers. By Frank Stanton's CBS news team, I believe.

NateBear said...

We'd buy the brooklyn bridge from you.

Paulrus said...

Saw that today in my email John. Congrats on the positive press!

Just a quick FYI, Clay Kaytis has a nice interview with Dale Baer and he talks about his time at Ralph Bakshi. He does the "Animation Podcast".

Perhaps one of these days you can do an interview with Clay as well.

Clinton said...

To add to mikesnj's point: if the top advertisers actually grew up watching Ren and Stimpy and other quality cartoons from the 90s, i would not count against those same advertisers wanting cartoons "like" Ren and Stimpy back on television.

I say "like" because I hope a hungry animator, if not myself, creates another iconic cartoon. something new for the next generation. you know what I mean, Vern?

Peggy said...

I've always felt that commercials are one of the few places an animator can actually have fun doing something that's up to their personal standards instead of the boring standards of most TV work - and get paid for it.

Kick some ass, John. Here's hoping that magazine's hitting the desk of a few brand managers who remember how bad they wanted to buy Log back in the 90s.

Nico said...

John, CONGRATS on all of this!! I'm so happy that this could lead to more new cartoons!!!

ALSO, if you get the annie award, FUTURE congratulations to you.

and thanks for the sandwich the other day. :)

Mr. Semaj said...

Sounds like you're finally getting your big break.

I look at commercials today, and it's not so much that they're detached from the show that bothers me, but that they're seldom even fun anymore.

Bitter Animator said...

Yikes. Personally, this is my idea of hell. I love your cartoons and would love to see more of them of course but creating what amounts to a bunch of little salesmen wouldn't be something I'd wish for you, Mr.K.

I think the programming business model is undergoing a huge change at the moment and things are going to be quite different in ten years time but I hope for viewer-bought content such as the DVD model, that is sold on entertainment value, rather than the advertiser paid for content, which is sold on the ability to hawk shit to kids.

That's just me. But, as ads go, yours are great.

stevef said...

The FCC certainly created a double standard with the Children's Television Act, the ruling that stopped characters in the show turing to the camera and saying, "Hey, kids! Buy my cereal." But allows producers to create toy-based cartoons ie: "Pokemon" and its ilk.

BTW: according to my source, "The Honeymooners" had it's original run on CBS. But the point is taken. Dumont didn't have the big stars, so they had to work harder.

The reason magazine spot schedules flourished after about 1960: more ad revenue for the networks, as more people bought TV's and watched longer, more advertisers became convinced TV was the way to go, so networks made room for them.

Today, as the old networks see their ratings drop and ad revenue drop as well, single-sponsor or "leased programming" is on the rise again. Ever wonder how Donald Trump keeps getting on NBC? There you go.

Jennifer said...

Congrats John!

I agree with stevef - I think the trend with American television is going back to the single sponsor or a handful of sponsors approach, and I think it's going back to the commercials mixed in with the show approach with product placement and sketches disguised as commercials.

For example: During the contest portion of American Idol, the show plays music videos featuring the remaining contestants that are actually commercials for Ford.

Art F. said...

Grats, John! Good to see your genius appreciated by more and more people.

Chris E. said...

Congratulations.