Sunday, July 27, 2008

Milt Gross Character Designs






21 comments:

Mark Stroud said...

"Not the Oswald Ponyface?" Great stuff, I like his pen and ink technique too.

Bubs said...

I never understood why poses and composition were so important to comics until I recently purchased a book called "The Big Book of Hell by Matt Groening" which puts together every "Life In Hell" comic into one book. All that is in every panel is a single, expressionless, bunny with dialouge. He might aswell have just written out the dialouge without putting in pictures. But it only cost 5 bucks so I don't really care.

Eddie Fitzgerald said...

Genius! Absolute and total genius!!!!!

Maitl said...

John, have you seen the latest issue of "Animation Magazine"? In it they not only have an interview with several leading cartoon execs saying some incredibly stupid things, they also have the results of a "pitch contest". In that contest, they asked animators and "animation writers" to submit pitches to execs (the same ones in the aforementioned interview). The execs would then judge them. Ultimately, all the pitches submitted were shown, and I cannot even begin to tell you how atrocious all of them are, even the ones chosen as "winners" by the exec judges. All of their ideas are so awful you wonder why they would even want to pitch them, much less have them printed in a magazine. I think it would be great if you devoted a blog entry to all the stupidity and downright awfulness in that issue.

patrick said...

He defined just how cartoony cartoons can be! Mindblowing poses too, particularly with Pete the Pooch.

One of my favourites along with Basil Wolverton

Whit said...

The execs, and agent, listed in that article are typical of everything wrong with the industry.

wascallywabbit said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
CHRIS LOPEZ said...

John, over at ComiCrazys, I'm posting the illustrations from the book Pasha the Persian that Gross illustrated but did not write himself. It'll be up this Monday.

Captain Napalm said...

>I never understood why poses and composition were so important to comics until I recently purchased a book called "The Big Book of Hell by Matt Groening" which puts together every "Life In Hell" comic into one book. All that is in every panel is a single, expressionless, bunny with dialouge. He might aswell have just written out the dialouge without putting in pictures. But it only cost 5 bucks so I don't really care.<

Yeah, you're right - oh, except for pages 6, 7, 8, 18, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 35, 36, 41, 43, 45, 46, 48, 50, 51, 52, 54, 55, 57, 59, 60, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 71, 72, 75, 77, 78, 83, 85, 89, 91, 94, 95, 96, 99, 100, 105, 106, 107, 113, 114, 116, 121, 123, 129, 136, 138, 140, 141, 142, 144, 145, 157 and 159. And no, those are not arbitrary numbers I chose at random.

Paul B said...

WOW!

I LOVE MILT GROSS DRAWINGS!

HE'S A GENIUS, NO DOUBT ABOUT IT.

THIS DRAWING IS HILLARIOUS AND SO FULL OF LIFE, AND FUNNY!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/tonto-kidd/2332429019/sizes/o/

he must have been a person who lived happy every day. at least his drawings express that.

Hey, could you recommend us another artists like Milt o Kurtzman, that don't draw like the classical way (pears and pipes..)

Thanks!

wascallywabbit said...

hey John I looked through your construction lessons and tried to draw some bugs bunny scenes on my blog! Let me know what you think!

luis said...

hello im a cartoonist and i work in a local newspaper in mexico, im a big fan of your work, this is my webpage:
www.cartunperez.com
best regards!

Chloe Cumming said...

These are brilliant... I think a lot of the life of it must come from observing humanity. Because however good you get at fun shapes in the abstract, there's got to be some insight there about people and their intrinsic funnyness.

Paul B said...

Hey John, me again

what do you think about Pat Ventura cartoons?

wascallywabbit said...

Hey John! I did a post on Bugs bunny and how hes changed through the years. You have my permission to use it in one of your future subjects on him!

http://constructionworker1934.blogspot.com/2008/07/bugs-bunny-has-gone-through-many.html

ken said...

Great drawings!
This is my favourite drawing style...20's comics....
guys like gross, sterrett, herriman, segar, etc.

their drawings have a great sense of composition, design, and never "over worked", or stiff.

Captain Napalm said...

John, I assume you've seen Vince Waller's animated version of "Hey, Look"? Let me say that I think he did a fantastic job. Ten solid minutes of gag-upon-gag genius.

perspex said...

Bubs said...I never understood why poses and composition were so important to comics until I recently purchased a book called "The Big Book of Hell by Matt Groening" which puts together every "Life In Hell" comic into one book. All that is in every panel is a single, expressionless, bunny with dialogue. He might as well have just written out the dialogue without putting in pictures. But it only cost 5 bucks so I don't really care.

I always thought that was the point in those comics. The sheer maudlin nature of that comic- I don't know about the rest of you, but that strip is far and away better than any old prime-time sit-bomb.

Bubs said...

Captain Napalm, don't get me wrong, I love the Life in Hell comics and The Simpsons, Futurama etc. All I am pointing out is that actually putting personality into the characters makes a comic more interesting and adds to the humor of the dialouge. I still think that Binky and the rest of the characters in Life in Hell lack personality and life. Use pages 16 and 17 as examples; All that is in every panel is two emotionless bunnies staring at eachother exchanging word bubbles with nothing changing but the position of their arms(which most of the time don't even seem attached to their bodies). Look at the Sheba character for goodness sake, she doesn't make a single expression... her pupils don't even move! Please don't get all "fanboy" on me and lash out with technicalities.

Bwanasonic said...

"Ultimately, all the pitches submitted were shown, and I cannot even begin to tell you how atrocious all of them are, even the ones chosen as "winners" by the exec judges. All of their ideas are so awful you wonder why they would even want to pitch them, much less have them printed in a magazine. I think it would be great if you devoted a blog entry to all the stupidity and downright awfulness in that issue."

Just picture a Milt Gross drawing of John K saying "BANANA OIL!"

Captain Napalm said...

>Captain Napalm, don't get me wrong, I love the Life in Hell comics and The Simpsons, Futurama etc. All I am pointing out is that actually putting personality into the characters makes a comic more interesting and adds to the humor of the dialouge. I still think that Binky and the rest of the characters in Life in Hell lack personality and life. Use pages 16 and 17 as examples; All that is in every panel is two emotionless bunnies staring at eachother exchanging word bubbles with nothing changing but the position of their arms(which most of the time don't even seem attached to their bodies). Look at the Sheba character for goodness sake, she doesn't make a single expression... her pupils don't even move! Please don't get all "fanboy" on me and lash out with technicalities.<

Oh no, I get where you're coming from. Groening knows he's no wizard with a pencil and he downplays the art a lot of the time, but it bugs me because I think the strips where he DOES stretch out are so good. Take those "category" strips, for instance - you know, the ones where he runs down all the recognizable sorts of brothers, sisters, coworkers, teachers, bosses, etc. Those strips have a new original character in every single panel, and they have some truly hilarious drawings, miles more funny than ANYTHING you would see Binky doing.

That's Groening's problem - unlike the supervisors on The Simpsons, who are trained artists, he doesn't know how to make a point and draw well at the same time. He's either lecturing, playing with words or doing crazy drawings. Rarely does he find a solid middle ground between these things.