Monday, February 09, 2009

some more

12 comments:

Shawn said...

Gaddammitt, those drawings impress me!

Elana Pritchard said...

Cool.

M. R Darbyshire said...

Ha-ha! I love the Settle & Antic expression.



Would you recommend we copy your drawings, which are more abstract than the comic covers?

I've already done some. The fact that I'm not linking to them should tell you how difficult I found them to be.

Trevor Thompson said...

Dammit, how long before we see this beautiful cartoon?

Yer killin' me, Smalls.

- trevor.

/\/\ikeB said...

Yes, apprenticeship certainly works.

But that doesn't mean the industry will revive its practice.

Ian Andersen said...

Not looking to contest your previous reply, but in case you were curious, the quote from Loomis is in the beginning of Figure Drawing For All It's Worth:
"I do not strongly recommend becoming helper to a successful artist in order to gain background. More often than not it is a discouraging experience. The reason is that you are continually matching your humble efforts against the stellar performance of your employer. You are not thinking and observing for yourself. You are usually dreaming, developing an inferiority complex, becoming an imitator. Remember: artists have no jealously guarded professional secrets. How often have I heard students say, 'If I could just watch that man work, I'm sure I could get ahead!' Getting ahead does not happen that way. The only mystery, if such it may be called, is the personal interpretation of the individual artist. He himself probably does not know his own 'secret.' Fundamentals you must master, but you can never do so by watching another man paint. You have to reason them out for yourself"

Of course he makes it sound as though the apprentice is playing nurse and simply handing the artist the tools he needs instead of actually learning how to use them. His point seems to be that it's better to seek out the fundamentals from other sources (like his books) than try to pick up on what someone else is doing by studying them in an apprenticeship.

Would you say that Loomis is to realism as Blair is to Animation? They both have a generic style but an incredibly strong understanding of the fundamentals. I know you decried people from the animation schools filling their portfolios with gesture drawings before, but anyone who's read Kimon Nicolaides book knows that those are simply exercises. I know realism isn't your field but do you think his approach to teaching art is effective?

Onjo said...

I got a job with a certain animated show on a certain network (actually it's a show that you really don't like, John) as a production assistant. I've never been to art school, but I am honing my latent abilities as an artist and animator just by being in that environment. With the addition of John K.'s philosophies of animation, I can work there and look objectively at what the show I'm working on is (super simple rubber stamp animation) but hey -- it's a start!

Kevin Langley said...

The second to last drawing, the antic, is brilliant. Wow.

Alberto said...

I see these drawings are beautiful, well done and well structured, but they don't seem to have a visible and constant structure, or structure lines, maybe it's the scanner...
I know we must first learn the fundamentals, but I ask: Does George Liquor is always based in the same structure? i.e. the head is always a circle, the hands are always constructed the same way etc.
I think I read Beverly Hale wrote that you must structure the way it seems at that pose, the head as a cube, or a sphere, maybe that only applies to figure drawing.

Alberto said...

By the way, those Kali clean-ups are superb!

Gabriele_Gabba said...

Firstly, I'm with Trevor, can't wait to see this bad boy!

Secondly, you forgot to mention what you clean up with. The thick and thins suggests ink and i know Kali likes her pens. Do your artists just go straight to ink? No pencil clean up?

I think a lot of personality tends to be lost in clean up, so i think going straight to ink would have a good advantage.

I love George's serious mug, he looks so military!

Nicol3 said...

I was thinking the same as 'dat Trevor fellow. How does one "clean house"? do you suggest pens or pen-cils?