Monday, October 18, 2010

more Arnold

I find it easier to caricature someone after I have done blander more "realistic" studies.

Boy, anatomy is filled with so many mysteries. I think someone would have to spend full time studying for a few years before beginning to understand how everything fits together. Otherwise, you end up just drawing superficial copies, like what I'm doing. Little by little some stuff starts to make sense, but I'd really need a good teacher to explain what's wrong and to physically correct the drawings in front of me.

One mystery is how all the mouth area fits together.

29 comments:

Rooniman said...

Just looking at all of those muscles makes me dizzy.

Marty Fugate said...

Somehow, your brain turns input from the eyes into lines. The conscious act of drawing is just the surface of the process. The magic is out of sight.

With caricature, I wind up doing tons of sketches I hate -- all mechanical, dead and lifeless.

On a good day, something finally clicks. I "get" the face -- and can capture it in a few lines.

But I have to get through all the dead sketches to get to that point. There are no shortcuts.

manuel said...

This image might be of help:
SuperMuscleMan

Erik B said...

haha Arnold looks like he hasn't got much brains in the top drawing because of the low forehead :P
but its a good drawing.

i like how you just show you're drawings, even if they're not perfect. my teachers in art school
mostly do not dare to make examples of their own work.
guess they're affraid that a student might critique them...

see art school confidential by Daniël Clowes, it's sometimes shockingly acurate...

http://www.wired.com/news/images/full/artschool2_f.jpg

Chloe Cumming said...

Your Arnolds are delightful. He was supposedly geometrically perfect in his prime, so you'd think a pretty good subject.

On the subject of solid drawing, someone has put all the important Andrew Loomis books online in PDF form and I am LAPPING it up. If only someone had given me these when I was five. it feels so backwards reading them now. I would have thought that you'd appreciate the clear logical explanations and setting out of principles. I'm sure you've encountered them but I was so impressed at this resource.

http://alexhays.com/loomis/

Roberto Severino said...

Did you learn anything about drawing anatomy at Sheridan College? Just asking. Anatomy sounds very complicated.

Jonathan Harris said...

That doodle at the top left of the second drawing looks very rude, John. You should be ashamed (proud?) of yourself.

ralphie p said...

im a big fan of caricatures, i still need some more schooling in that department, excellent study.

muscles look dope. i'm assuming you are drawing from photographs right?

John T. Quinn 3rd said...

spectacular.

blakeaj said...

Maybe you should search online for Andrew Loomis' "Figure Drawing For All Its Worth". He was an illustrator during the 50s, and the mentioned book has a section with detailed muscle breakdowns.

Also his "Drawing the Head and Hands" can be useful, as Arnie's head seems to be 99% muscle and bone, and almost no fat.

Andrés Sanhueza said...

I have a doubt. Generally you complain about how "realistic" designs are impractical for animation. I agree, but you and Jim Smith also designed The Ripping Friends that, although still being obvious caricatures, rely a lot of understanding actual human anatomy and you complained that the animators weren't able to get it.

Mykal said...

You say that, but your Arnold certainly looks like everything "fits together" pretty well! I wouldn't know how to do it myself, but it is the fitting together part that my ex-artist girlfriend took so deadly seriously. That was her constant complaint about bad cartooning - "he doesn't know anatomy." She had books of skeletons and muscle structure like she was studying to be a doctor.

Are you really that humble? Darn, you captured Arnie perfectly! I can almost her him speaking in that bullyboy/Austrian accent! Joyful yet brutal.

Mattieshoe said...

Say, John, What do you think of corny Schwarzenegger movies like Commando?

I love them, shamelessly entertaining and hilarious.

JohnK said...

I thought Commando was his best movie.

-jjmm- said...

What about the comedies directed by Ivan Reitman? I think they are great; all with narrative structures from a classic school but with hilarious argumental gags and naturally absurd premises only possible in a mind living in the 90's.

kurtwil said...

Just curious, J.K...which time period of Arnold were your sketches based on?
Or are they a composite of several years?

In 2000 Arnold had a huge trailer filled with gym equipment parked on THE SIXTH DAY shooting set in Vancouver. We weren't allowed to talk to him on set, but could chat with his handlers (10 - 12). That film has a few poses of him flexing muscles.

Eve said...

It's really easy to draw men too stiff. I only recently overcame my man drawing troubles. The cure: draw a man with a full behind and full legs, just like I draw women, but narrower, for that's where the bulk and distributor of weight is. However, finding men who look like that in real life or the media is difficult. Whenever you see a superhero, he lacks a behind. To make matters worse, most men in real life where baggy clothes. So weight distribution and the location versatility of the iliac crest was a mystery to me for a long-long time. Then it hit me: Why imitate reality? My girls are an exaggeration of reality, why am I grounding my men to the norm? So, I turned to the same source I use for most of my females: ballet dancers.
Talk about a fantasy world. Danseurs have nice strong legs, nice big arms and minimal pecs, which is perfect for my purposes. Furthermore, they MOVE and don't stand stiff and boring as boards, like Mr. Boring Guy at a bar.

Thank you, Roberto Bolle!

martinus said...

I always find that if someone's likeness is so ingrained in our minds, like most celebs like Arnie, I do better caricatures from memory. The photos always make me want to copy them, where if I draw from memory I get the essence of their likeness and leave the rest behind.

BadIdeaSociety said...

Young Arnold has this sort of domed subhuman roundness to the top part of his head that you have kind of missed. But it still looks great.

Chloe Cumming said...

I love Commando.

I'm quite partial to The Running Man and Total Recall too. They are a bit cerebral by comparison.

Someone else mentioned Loomis! It must be in the air. I love that he says stuff like 'Perspective looks harder than it is. You must know it to draw.' No nonsense, but very accessible.

Of course I had a perfunctory crack at drawing Arnold back in the day

arnold boyman party

Erik B said...

Also a big commando fan here!

The tool shed scene is brilliant!

The Rake said...

Out of curiosity, does anyone know how many years Bob McKimson studied anatomy for?

Luke said...

@ Andres Sanhueza

The difference between his realistic design, and let's just say, He-Man, for example. Is that his designs are solidly constructed and functional to animate, though still hard. But the way John creates his cartoons is very clear and easy to understand if you folow certain rules, so I understand where he's coming from, somewhat.

As for anatomy, it still baffles me, even on a cartooning level.

Yowp said...

John, in reading these posts, I keep thinking .. didn't some of the Golden Age animators study anatomy before working for a cartoon studio?

Kirk said...

the irony is, strict anatomists, in their effort to account for each muscles relationship to the other, always fail to render bodies as we perceive them, where a certain loose contour seems to do the latter most successfully.

Leonardo complained Michaelangelo's painted figures looked like sacks of potatoes.

J C Roberts said...

I'm assuming you've referenced muscular anatomy images somewhere along the way. They won't do much for capturing the specifics of a distinct individual face, but knowing where the basic muscle groups common to everyone are connected.

Each different face should start with these, and even though factors like amount of fat and size and shape of the features make big differences, it should all be related to the same basic muscle groups.

I find depicting the way the mouth connects up is more dependent on the overall detail level you're going for the other parts of the face. If you're aiming for the full range of shading you can get in most of the detail. Line drawings, and especially cleaned up for animation seems more a matter of suggesting it with a simple line in just the right place.

It took me a while to really see the way human mouths are designed in Hanna Barbera characters-a line pointing up from the edges of the lower lip. I almost always capped the edges of the mouth with a line the extended in both directions, but just pointing it up or down helps to suggest either a jutting jaw or a doofus overbite respectively.

Chances are none of this is new info to you, though, but the mouth is certainly tricky sometimes. The outer corners of the eyes have similar problems.

Matzi said...

HI JOhnÇ! i always wanted to know which is the sound you use to make appear something, that "swish", "chime". Always when something "appears". You can hear it when Ren gives the ironed pants to stimpy in "stimpys invention". I always wanted that sound! Is brillant!

vinimation said...

First time commenter, but I had to say I really appreciate your commitment to understanding structure and anatomy. That's old school man! The results of your analysis are always a revelation. Thank you.

bergsten said...

The great thing about Arnold is that he's already a caricature.

Wouldn't want to arm-wrestle him though...